Wednesday, August 21, 2019

The Sulphur Butterflies

They form a worldwide family of several hundred species.
They are among the first butterflies to appear in spring.
The colors vary from white to yellow to even orange.
Yesterday, 
the hubs and I saw two that were neon green and apparently they belong to this family as well!
I have several resources, 
and I am still not sure which of the hundred species these sulfurs fall in to.

This one, white with very little markings,
it's wings are curved in a way I did not see in my book.

This one very torn and tethered had grayish markings on the end of the wings.
It's wings curve upward, different then the first one.

This one also had gray-black markings on the end of it's wings.

This is another picture of the second one, you can see here that much of it's wings are missing.

I released 3 butterflies yesterday and I see 2 in the cage right now.
This is real time as I am writing and posting on Wednesday morning.
I still get so excited when I see them,
I am having so much fun and I am saving the butterflies at the same time.

Win, win for everyone!
Now I must go clean the cage!

18 comments:

  1. Wow, looks so fragile and pretty☺

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  2. Sure a lot of different butterflies:) These are very attractive but indeed different.

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  3. Hi Debbie: I think your butterfly is a West Virginia White, but if you can get a second opinion that would be good! My second choice would be Mustard White.

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    1. thanks david, i think it could be either, they are so similar. the pictures i looked at on line show a small bright yellow marking on the top of the wing, i don't see that in the butterflies i photographed. still, i am also leaning toward the west virginia white, thanks again for your help!!

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  4. Hello, you do sound like you enjoy raising the butterflies. It must feel wonderful to be able to release them into the wild. Beautiful shots and post. Have a great day!

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  5. Whoa girl, now that's one I've never seen! White! Thank you as always, Debbie. :)

    xoxo

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  6. The joy you feel raising the butterflies comes through in every post, I think it's wonderful.
    Once again you've shared some beautiful photographs.

    Can you believe Wednesday is here already! The week is flying by so quickly.

    All the best Jan

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  7. Pretty sure those are similar to what I've seen in our garden. I wasn't sure about it but its wings looked a bit ragged and it seemed to be picking up a reflection of colour from the flower it was on. I had wondered whether it was a moth at the time but now I can see it comes from the Sulphur family. Thanks Debbie :D)
    I can have a little understanding of the excitement you must feel as you release yet another butterfly. Its your thing and you're so in tune with these darling creatures.

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  8. Some of the butterflies I see around here look bedraggled too. It’s easy to tell you love helping the butterflies, Debbie. Well done.

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  9. I see lots of the sulphurs around here as well.I've had a hard time trying to get pictures, cause they always seem to be on the move.

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  10. Your photos are so sharp and clear, beautiful!

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  11. I love how you love and know so much about butterflies. I do not think I have ever seen a white one before.

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  12. Those are beautiful! I like how you can see the eyes so clearly!

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  13. those are gorgeous even with the tattered wings, I like the bit of gray on the ends. You never knew how much time it was going to take to raise butterflies did you, how fun to have that to see letting them go, I bet it never gets old, good for you!

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  14. I have never seen such beautiful butterflies here.

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