Thursday, March 21, 2013

Robin, I Wonder...

I spent the better part of the morning reading through my bird books,
searching for pictures and information about the American Robin!!
 
As an avid bird lover, how many books do I have, you ask??
 
I have five, but I really only need one.
 
This one....it's my favorite, my go to book and the perfect bird guide!
The pages are worn and the cover is falling off,
part of the reason I love it so much.
 
This is my second favorite, because you can hear all
the beautiful songs of my backyard birds.
 
This is a great book also,
I didn't need it but it was only three dollars at
Christmas Tree Store, so I had to buy it!
 
These two are much older, I received them from a friend of my moms.
She was moving and no longer wanted them.
 
After browsing, reading and getting very distracted,
I didn't find what I was looking for, so off to Google I went.
How did we ever "find things out" without Google.
 
So here's the big question, I never found the answer to...
 
Why is this Robin's belly so white??
 
And this one so orange??
 
I took these pictures on March 17th, while it was snowing,
it wasn't snow.
 
And aren't Robins suppose to be a sign of Spring,
they have the date right but poor babies, the weather sure has been off.
 
So who will be first to answer that oh so important question?!?!

25 comments:

  1. well, according to my Crossley ID Guide (MY all-time favorite bird book), it is an immature bird. they have the white on their chest.

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  2. Not me. But I sure will be paying attention to see if someone else knows. Cause I've seen these little lighter/whiter tummied robins and wondered the same!

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  3. I don't know. :-( I'm a newbie when it comes to recognizing birds and knowing facts about them.

    Thank you for showing us your books. It gives me some ideas about what to buy!

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  4. oh, i would enjoy seeing one of those one day. so pretty. too cool!! i love all your bird books - you look like my mom.

    one day she let me borrow one to look something to look up??! & then suddenly i did keep it for a while - then suddenly one day last year & i get the question Beth where is my bird book??!!?! - so i go in search & bring all the bird books i had - guess what? the silly book was at her house the whole time. i never had it. ha. ha!! so silly. ( :

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  5. Welcome Debbie!
    You have a beautiful collection for the birds.
    Great post and great photos.
    Regards

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  6. I love robins. I was glad to see that TexWis had the answer to your question. I will be taking a closer look. The robins are back here in abundant numbers but that is the only sign of spring.

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  7. Good question! I have no clue. But thanks for the help with the books. I want to put one on my wish list. Now I know what one.

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  8. A pattern of unusual coloring (white on the red breast) is thought to be a genetic mutation affecting production of feather pigments. The technical term for these oddly colored robins is leucism, meaning there are defects in the pigment producing cells in particular parts of the bird.

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  9. the pics I looked at the ones with white were female....for whatever that's worth!

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  10. Not a clue - but I enjoy your photos! Maybe our warm Spring last year confused the poor little things,and they jumped the gun this year.

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  11. Debbie, cute shots of your adorable robins. I would agree with Tex about the the one with the white is an immature! Have a happy weekend!

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  12. TexWisGirl is correct. Juvenile probably born late last summer.

    Cute shots! Funny, down here in Florida, robins are sure sign of winter. When they leave it's spring here.

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  13. Hi Debbie. I haven't commented in a while but I do so enjoy your blog. Your photography is always so amazing!! Thanks for sharing with us. Have a great weekend.

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  14. I'd go with TexWisGirl's answer. She knows her birds!

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  15. I think the comment by TexWis may be correct in that the birds with more white or speckled chests are young immature birds and the older ones have the orange-red chest. I've also photographed both.

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  16. I don't know...but we use to have oodles of Robins in our yard...but now that the house is sold.. so much for all our birds:)..

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  17. Haven't the foggiest, so I'm going with Tex!

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  18. I don't know, probably the same reason my hair is gray instead of the black it used to be. Seriously TexWisGirl's answer seems to make the most sense!!! Have fun figuring it out!!!

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  19. Wow, I haven't seen one like that!

    I have quite a few bird books but I rarely use them now. For a while I had a big poster of Eastern Birds on my fridge.

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  20. I can't help you but it seems TexWisGirl can... Seems like a good answer to me :)

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  21. Hi Debbie that is easy he is OLD and grey:) Hugs B

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  22. Interesting...you got about three different possible answers!

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  23. I vote for the pigment defects answer, myself. Mostly, I just wish the robins would hurry up and get here, already!!!! Although we do have redwings in the marsh...
    I once saw a white redwing in the fall flock, for a few days. I bet he got eaten fast...

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